List of Acid-Forming Foods

You may ask: What is with the alkaline vs. Acidic diet?

Well, scientifically speaking, it is all about health. Did you know that your blood pH must be a little on the alkaline side for you to stay healthy and be able to fight diseases?  However, you must keep your alkaline level balance within the range of 7.35-7.45. Although a pH level of 7.0 is considered as neutral, going below this line is considered as acidic.

How Do You Become Acidic?

Your pH becomes acidic generally because of the foods you eat. Acid-forming foods, toxins ingestion, emotional and physical stress, or immune system reaction will produce more acid than your body needs. In general, any process or activity that deprives your body’s cells of nutrients and oxygen will result in very high acidity in the blood.

What Happens When You Go Acidic?

If your pH level goes below the neutral line, your body will not be able to absorb as much nutrients as in its alkaline state. Moreover, the body’s capacity to repair cells that are damaged is also hindered, as well as the capacity to detoxify the harmful heavy metals that are present in the body. If your body experience these, you will become more susceptible to diseases and you will tire more easily.

List of Acidifying Foods

Acidifying foods do not need to be acidic in their natural state. For instance, lemons are very acidic when tested in their natural state, but once they are consumed and digested by the body, they become highly alkaline.

In fact, lemons are among the foods with the highest alkaline production. On the other hand,corn, although it may appear low in acid in its natural state, produces very high acid levels when digested. This is mainly due to its very high sugar content.

To make things easier for you, let’s just say that most food with high levels of starch and sugar become highly acidic when digested.  To help you determine which foods to avoid, here is a complete list of acid-forming foods:

Acidifying Vegetables

Corn
Lentils
Winter Squash
Olives

Acidifying Fruits

Blueberries
Cranberries
Plums
Currants
Prunes
Sweetened Fruits (Canned, Glazed, or Dried)

Acidifying Grains

Oatmeal
Rolled Oats
Amaranth
Noodles
Wheat Germ
Spaghetti
Barley
Rice Cakes
Wheat Bran
Cornstarch
Quinoa
Wheat flour
Spelt
White Flour
Kamut
Oat Bran
Bread
Rye
Corn
Soda Crackers
Hemp Flour
Macaroni
Rice
Wheat

Acidifying Legumes, Beans

White Beans
Kidney Beans
Almond Milk
Rice Milk
Chickpeas
Black Beans
Green Peas
Soybeans
Lentils
Red Beans
Pinto Beans
Soy Milk

Acidifying Dairy

Cheese
Ice Milk
Ice Cream
Butter
Processed Cheese

Acidifying Nuts (and Nut Butters)

Cashews
Peanuts
Peanut Butter
Pecans
Walnuts
Tahini

Acidifying Animal Protein

Sausage
Bacon
Lamb
Shellfish
Carp
Beef
Pork
Sardines
Cod
Fish
Salmon
Haddock
Rabbit
Mussels
Shrimp
Veal
Clams
Venison
Corned Beef
Tuna
Lobster
Oyster
Pike
Organ Meats
Scallops
Turkey

Other Acidifying Food Items

Apart from the foods listed above, there are other acid-forming foodstuffs. Avocado oil, corn oil, canola, butter, olive oil, flaxseed oil, hemp oil, sesame oil, safflower oil, and sunflower oil produces high acid levels when digested by the body. Add to this list the sweeteners, such as corn syrup, sugar and carob, as well as beer, wines and spirits and hard liquor. Catsup, coffee, mustard, soft drinks, pepper and cocoa also form high levels of acids.

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